Open House in Manchester CT ~ Sunday, September 30, 2012



Open House ~ 77 Croft Drive, Manchester CT


Open House in Manchester CTThis Sunday, September 30, 2012, from 12:00 to 3:00 p.m., 77 Croft Drive, Manchester CT will be open for your viewing. This home is located in a quiet neighborhood on the Manchester/South Windsor line.

 

 

Listed at $259,900, this U-shaped ranch features.

  • three bedrooms
  • two full baths
  • large master bedroom with 16×10 sitting area, vaulted ceiling, and sliders to deck
  • large eat-in, updated kitchen with granite counters and tile backsplash
  • two-station home office/family room with lots of cabinets
  • wine room with built-in wine storage
  • formal dining room with sliders to wraparound deck
  • formal living room with dark hardwood floors
  • backyard oasis with pool, gazebo, pond, custom stonework, gardens, and professional landscaping

Please come to see it yourself. Everything has been updated, including roof, furnace, windows, and septic system. Nothing to do but move and enjoy the space for relaxing or entertaining.

Join me at the Open House this Sunday, September 30, 2012, from 12:00-3:00 p.m. at 77 Croft Drive, Manchester CT!

 

77 Croft Drive Manchester CT on YouTube

 

 

 

 

 

Peggy Chirico, REALTOR®
Serving the Greater Hartford Area
Prudential Connecticut Realty


If you are buying or selling a home in Hartford County or Tolland County, please call me at 860-748-8900, , or use the Contact Request Form.  I would be happy to help you with your home search or answer any of your real estate questions.

Find your dream home now!

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Baby Boomer Series ~ What To Do with Too Many Books



What to do with too many booksIn previous posts, we have dealt with the process of downsizing possessions especially if people are thinking about moving to smaller homes. In addition to cleaning out the attic and sorting through old photographs, another special category that must be addressed is what to do with book collections. Like photographs, books often have sentimental value so people may not be able to part with them.


I just spent the last two weeks going through my book collections so I know how difficult this can be. I had a full range of book types, from old paperbacks to beautifully-bound editions, from text books to coffee table books. Some I look at frequently, and some I haven’t glanced at in decades. The task of deciding what to keep and what I could part with was daunting. Here are a few ways to make the task manageable:

Sort Books into Categories 

The first step is sorting. Depending on your collection, you may come up with different categories but mine fell into these categories:

  • Textbooks
  • Paperbacks (fiction and non-fiction)
  • Children’s books
  • Reference books
  • Library-edition bound classics
  • Business books
  • Hard cover fiction
  • Coffee table books
  • Instructional books

Separate Each Category into Three Piles

For each category, I further separated them into three piles: those I wanted to keep, those I might want to keep, and those I didn’t want to keep. The smallest pile was the last one, so I knew I had to eliminate some books from the first two piles.  By asking myself a few questions, I was able to bring myself to part with many of my books:

  • Will I ever read it again?
  • Is the information still current?
  • Can someone else get more use out of it than I currently do?
  • Will I regret giving it away?

From there, I was able to really downsize my collection. I ended up keeping many of my coffee table books, some reference books, some of my favorite fiction and non-fiction books, most of my travel guides, a few instructional books, and the gifts that people gave me. So I will still have all the books that I use frequently as well as enough books for a small bookcase.

What To Do with Books You Don’t Want

That left hundreds of books that I wasn’t sure what to do with, but I still wanted them to go to good use. So I searched for options for the books and found several great outlets.

  • I asked friends and family to take what they might be interested in.
  • I donated books in good condition to my local library for their Friends of the Library book sale.
  • I donated many children’s books to local literacy programs.
  • I found a religious organization that ships encyclopedias and textbooks (which the library won’t accept) to other countries. I’m not sure where they will end up but I felt better that they were going somewhere.
  • I sold some textbooks on eBay. You can also sell all your books on eBay, but I decided that I didn’t want to do that so I chose other options.

If you want to know whether the organization you are donating to (for books or other items) is reputable, check it out on Charity Navigator or another charity-ranking site.

Sorting through old books was another time-consuming task, but it will make your next move easier if you decide you want to downsize.

Other posts in the Baby Boomer Series:

Hey Baby Boomers! Have You Had Enough Yet?

Cleaning Out the Attic

Thinking Ahead 

 

Sorting Through Old Photographs

 

 

Peggy Chirico, REALTOR®
Serving the Greater Hartford Area
Prudential Connecticut Realty


If you are buying or selling a home in Hartford County or Tolland County, please call me at 860-748-8900, , or use the Contact Request Form.  I would be happy to help you with your home search or answer any of your real estate questions.

Find your dream home now!

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Baby Boomer Series ~ Sorting Old Photographs



Sorting through old photosIf you are a baby boomer, you probably have mountains of memories in the form of old photographs. If you are like me, you not only printed every picture you ever took, but you also got doubles of them because they were free! After all, you never knew who might want a set of your vacation photos. Newsflash–no one!


Yesterday, I decided that I would tackle all of the boxes of photos that I had accumulated (they never even made it into an album) as well as all the albums that I made and that I acquired from well-meaning relatives. I don’t want to take boxes of photos if I decide to move, yet I don’t want to lose the great ones that tell my family’s history.

This is not an easy task, so here are a few suggestions that worked for me.

Sort the photographs

  • Sort the photos into two piles: scenery and people. I ended up throwing away most of the scenery photos because they weren’t that great to begin with, they were beginning to fade anyway, and National Geographic has better pictures of the beach in San Juan anyway, if I ever need it.
  • Sort the people pictures into three piles: the professional photos, the super shots of family and friends, the ones that are too dark and of poor quality (if you can’t see facial features clearly put them in this pile). Keep just one copy of the professionally-taken photos and put the others in a bag for family members to look at and decide if they want any. Throw out the pile with the photos where you can’t recognize who is in the picture.
  • Sort the super shots of family and friends into piles. Eliminate duplicates and keep a sample of events (do you really need every race your child ever ran or every game they ever played?).  Make sure you have at least some pictures of everyone in the family.

Scan the photographs

Once you have whittled down the collection, decide how you are going to store and save the best of the photographs. The best way is to scan your pictures into digital format so they can be preserved with integrity. When I looked at the album I compiled of a trip to England in 1975, all the pictures were now sepia-toned because they weren’t stored well.

For some of the best of my family’s photos like my grandparents’ wedding picture, I scanned those myself on my scanner. I could then do some simple editing and they will now be safeguarded.

But for the mountains of candid shots, it will be easier and faster to send them out to a scanning service. For a fee, you can ship your photos in a box, they will scan and return a digital copy as well as the original photos. For a premium, you can also have them scanned, restored, and sharpened. Then you can share them easily with other members of your family.

Make a collage or two

Instead of having 8×10 or larger framed pictures all over your house, which you will have to pare down anyway, consider a few framed collages of key events.  These will still let you look at cherished photos, yet they can be easily moved and displayed as you wish.

Share your photos

Once you have scanned your photos, you are free to toss out the real thing. You can easily share the scanned pictures with your family. If they want a paper copy, they can easily print out the few pictures. I offered the boxes of photos to my family before I threw them out, but of course no one took me up on my offer.  They have lived most of their lives in the era of digital photography and have easy access to their memories. The few pictures they want from the pre-digital era will be scanned and ready for them.

Sorting though old pictures will eventually have to be done. Don’t put it off another day. It wasn’t as difficult as I thought it would be, and I feel as though a huge weight has been lifted. It’s just one more step toward being able to pack up and move out, if I choose to do so.

 

Other posts in the Baby Boomer Series:

Hey Baby Boomers! Have You Had Enough Yet?

Cleaning Out the Attic

Thinking Ahead 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peggy Chirico, REALTOR®
Serving the Greater Hartford Area
Prudential Connecticut Realty


If you are buying or selling a home in Hartford County or Tolland County, please call me at 860-748-8900, , or use the Contact Request Form.  I would be happy to help you with your home search or answer any of your real estate questions.

Find your dream home now!

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Baby Boomer Series ~ Thinking Ahead



Where do you want to spend your retirement years?In the Baby Boomer Series, I address the issues facing people who are in the throes of making decisions about their later years.


One of those decisions is where you want to spend your retirement years. Some people will choose to remain exactly where they are; some will opt for other locations or other living arrangements. Another post will explore prime locations for retirees, but before you even make that decision, it is wise to consider a few criteria.

A Tale of Two Women

This post was prompted by a recent visit to two relatives, each of whom is living in a popular retirement area.  Both are 84-year-old widowed women.  They both began living in their current homes when their husbands were alive, and now they are living alone. As I visited with each of them, I started to think that the choices we make in early retirement or even pre-retirement are going to impact us long after those early fun-filled active retirement years so it’s wise to think ahead when making those decisions.

One woman lives in a single-family home in a quiet neighborhood near shopping and amenities. Her neighbors are mainly young families with children; most of her time is spent inside her house except when she walks her small dog. She has a yard with nice plantings, a fish pond, and a pool and lanai. When she and her husband bought the property, they considered it easy maintenance compared to their larger home in the north, but now this house requires maintenance that the woman is not able to do.  And although she is in a warm sunny locale and can accommodate visitors, she doesn’t have frequent company.

The other woman lives in an age-restricted community in a single family home. The community takes care of the exterior maintenance and a service is available to help with inside chores. She is close to many people her own age and can participate in a variety of activities. She has frequent visitors because friends and family enjoy the lifestyle as well as all the amenities that are available.

Neither situation is perfect, and people must decide what is best for them. Some never want to give up neighborhood living and will simply hire people to do the work; others would prefer to have it done for them. Some enjoy their solitude, while others enjoy the company of others. So here are just a few things to consider, in no particular order:

Do you want to live in an age-restricted community?

Some people want to be around people of all ages so they opt for a neighborhood or a non-age-restricted complex, thinking that the sound of children’s voices will be always welcome. But it’s important to remember that even age-restricted communities have children visiting, and often under joyful circumstances (vacations). In addition, an active adult community may offer the activities, social interaction, and support that will be positive factors in older adulthood.

Do you want to be responsible for exterior maintenance?  

Whether you pay a monthly fee to the community, you hire someone to do it, or you complete the work on your own, exterior maintenance must be done. Some people think they can handle it themselves, so why pay someone to do it. But as we age, it becomes a chore that we might not want to do ourselves. Do you want someone to worry about it or do you want to arrange for your own  maintenance people?

Do you want easy access to social activities?

Some people are solitary sorts while others want to be surrounded by people of like interests.  If you don’t take your own personality into account when you make your decisions, you may feel frustrated or depressed by trying to fit into a situation that doesn’t suit you. If you are not a social person, you wouldn’t want to pay a premium for living in a highly social environment. If you enjoy constant companionship, you will feel isolated in a more remote location.

Do you have easy access to health care and other services?

You may not have a problem driving distances to various appointments now, but that may change as the years go on.  When deciding about where you will spend your retirement years, consider whether you will have easy access to health care, shopping, and other services. If you can’t get to your appointments yourself, how easy will it be to arrange to get there?

Do you want to be close to family?

Some people stay where they are because of family, while others move to be closer to family. If you can’t be close to family, are you in a place where it is easy for them to visit? One of the women I mentioned above doesn’t live close to family but she is on a route that people often pass through so she has plenty of visitors; the other one doesn’t have frequent visitors because she is farther from destinations that people travel to or through.

Of course, there are many other questions to be asked and answered before making a decision about where to spend your retirement years, but much thought should go into what type of environment suits you best. Well-thought out decisions will not only make life more enjoyable now but will also make life less stressful in later years.

 

 

 

 

Peggy Chirico, REALTOR®
Serving the Greater Hartford Area
Prudential Connecticut Realty


If you are buying or selling a home in Hartford County or Tolland County, please call me at 860-748-8900, , or use the Contact Request Form.  I would be happy to help you with your home search or answer any of your real estate questions.

Find your dream home now!

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2011 Year in Review ~ East Hartford CT



East Hartford CT was a busy market for real estate sales in 2011, but not quite as active as in 2010. According to MLS data, there were 307 closed sales in 2011 compared to 343 in 2010. In addition, the median price dropped to $144,000 in 2011 from $155,000 in 2010.  That’s a 7.1% decrease in median price and 10.5% drop in closed sales.


Here is a look at the closed sales by month:

Closed Sales in East Hartford CT in 2010 and 2011

As was typical for many markets, East Hartford showed a surge in activity in the months before the expiration of the homebuyers’ tax credits on June 30, 2010.  This activity could not be matched in 2011, but from July through the end of the year, 2011 generally outpaced the same months of 2010, showing a more optimistic trend. There are plenty of bargains to be had in East Hartford, and buyers seemed to be taking advantage of that.

To see what is available in East Hartford CT today, search for East Hartford CT real estate here. You can change your criteria to find the perfect match for you.

 

Peggy Chirico, REALTOR®
Serving the Greater Hartford Area
Prudential Connecticut Realty


If you are buying or selling a home in Hartford County or Tolland County, please call me at 860-748-8900, , or use the Contact Request Form.  I would be happy to help you with your home search or answer any of your real estate questions.

Find your dream home now!

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2011 Year in Review ~ South Windsor CT



South Windsor CT real estate sales during 2011 showed a fairly typical picture of the ups and downs of the market.  As was the case with many towns in Connecticut, South Windsor closed sales and median price were down from the previous year.  In 2011, there were 195 closed sales compared to 202 closed sales in 2010; the median price was $254,900 in 2011 vs. $274,450 in 2010.  So closed sales were down 3.47% while median price was down 7.12%.


If we look at the average price ($294,398 in 2011 vs. $296,397 in 2010), the difference was .8%.  Why consider both median and average prices? The median price simply places all the values in order and selects the one in the middle, whereas the average takes the numerical average.  One high-priced home will bring up the average significantly, but it won’t affect the median price.  So an average price provides an indication of the breadth of home values, whereas a median price tells you which home value was in the middle. It is important to look at both average and median prices, as well as which homes actually sold.

Here is a comparison of the number of closed sales by month for 2010 and 2011 in South Windsor CT:

Closed Sales in South Windsor CT in 2011 and 2010As in just about every other town, South Windsor showed a surge in closed sales in June 2010, which was the deadline for the homebuyers’ tax credits.  But from July through September of 2011, closed sales beat out the prior year, and then once again dipped below 2010 levels.

While there are plenty of sour notes in the real estate market in general, South Windsor fared well overall, posting a minor decrease in closed sales over the prior year, a modest decrease in median price, and virtually no change in average price.

 

Peggy Chirico, REALTOR®
Serving the Greater Hartford Area
Prudential Connecticut Realty


If you are buying or selling a home in Hartford County or Tolland County, please call me at 860-748-8900, , or use the Contact Request Form.  I would be happy to help you with your home search or answer any of your real estate questions.

Find your dream home now!

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2011 Year in Review ~ Manchester CT



2011 has closed and the real estate analysis has been done.  By most accounts 2011 was a worse year than 2010, but let’s take a look at what actually happened in Manchester CT in 2011.


During 2011, there were 321 closed sales with a median price of $169,000.  Both number of closed sales and median price were down from the previous year, which posted 358 closed sales with a median price of $185,000.  So the median price decreased by 8.65% and the number of closed sales decreased by 10.3%.

If we look at average sale price, which was $188,808 in 2011 vs. $201,788 in 2010, the average price decreased by 6.43%.  

Here is a look at 2010 and 2011 closed sales by month:

Closed Sales in Manchester CT

As you can see, there was quite a bit of variability among months. Remember that the home-buyer tax credits expired in June 2010 so we saw a surge of activity in the months preceding the deadline.  We also saw a surge in June 2011 because the real estate conveyance tax was set to increase on 7/1/11.

We don’t have any incentives on the horizon, unless you count the very low mortgage rates we have been enjoying, so we will have to wait to see how 2012 turns out.  Going forward, I will be reporting both the average sale price and the median sale price.

 

Peggy Chirico, REALTOR®
Serving the Greater Hartford Area
Prudential Connecticut Realty


If you are buying or selling a home in Hartford County or Tolland County, please call me at 860-748-8900, , or use the Contact Request Form.  I would be happy to help you with your home search or answer any of your real estate questions.

Find your dream home now!

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“I Don’t Take Referrals!”



Real Estate ReferralsI recently had an opportunity to try to find a stellar REALTOR® for some relatives who are thinking of relocating to another state. My relatives understand how referrals work and were only too happy to have me screen people and provide someone who would provide superior service.


So I began the process that I have done so many times–searching online for professionals who will take the same degree of interest as I would, talking to those whose web presence gives me an idea of how they work, and asking others in my networks for suggestions. Each client is different and I try to find what I think is a match for them (an inexact science to be sure, but I have good intuitive skills!).

I had narrowed down my search to a few people and shared the information with my relatives.  One of the people I chose seemed to match their style–both were fairly analytical, detail-oriented, and number-crunchers.  However, when I called the agent and told him that I would like to refer someone to him, he seemed to be surprised.  He said he doesn’t do referrals!  I was a little stunned, to say the least, so I asked him why he doesn’t. He told me that he can’t afford to give up any type of referral fee so he just doesn’t do them.

It’s his choice, I suppose, but why would anyone turn down a referral?  Maybe he is too busy and prefers to work only with his own clients, but I didn’t sense that.  I think he is not busy enough and doesn’t understand how vital referrals are to business, even if you have to give up a small part of your commission.

Why I Love Referring People to Others

When I give someone a referral, it says that I trust that the person will do as thorough a job as I would.  I don’t pick names out of a hat.  I research who they are, what markets they work in, what type of personality they have, how conscientious they are, etc.  Then I talk to them over the phone to pick up more cues.  I don’t work for free; I earn a referral fee.  Most of the time, the referral works out great and it beats taking chances with unknown agents.

Why I Love Getting Referrals

When I get a referral from someone, it is (to me) the greatest compliment anyone can give me.  It says that they trust that I will do a good job for them; I don’t take that lightly.  I gladly pay a referral fee because without the referral, I wouldn’t have that business.

So when someone tells me that they don’t do referrals, I say that’s unfortunate–for them. I love giving referrals and I love getting referrals.

If you are considering moving to the sunny south for your retirement years or are just thinking of exploring homes for sale in another state or area, let me know.  I will work hard to find you an agent who will do as good a job as I would.

And if you are thinking about moving into the central Connecticut area or if you know someone who is, give me a call! I will take very good care of them.

 

 

 

Peggy Chirico, REALTOR®
Serving the Greater Hartford Area
Prudential Connecticut Realty


If you are buying or selling a home in Hartford County or Tolland County, please call me at 860-748-8900, , or use the Contact Request Form.  I would be happy to help you with your home search or answer any of your real estate questions.

Find your dream home now!

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Baby Boomers Series ~ Cleaning Out the Attic



In the Baby Boomer Series, I am going to address topics that pertain to people of my generation–baby boomers who are planning for the next steps in their lives.


Cleaning out the atticContrary to conventional wisdom, at least in my opinion, the most important step is not deciding where or how one wants to spend his or her retirement years; the most important step is CLEANING OUT THE ATTIC!

Regardless of whether you plan to stay in your home, move across town, or relocate to the sunny south, you must clean out the attic. If you are like me, you have lived a considerable number of years in the same house and have amassed a lot of crap memories in the attic.

Why do I think cleaning out the attic is the most important step? Because it will allow you make a quicker decision if you have to. If you clean out the attic now, well in advance of any decisions you need to make, you will be able act upon your decision quicker. And if you choose to spend your retirement years in the same house, you won’t be leaving the dreaded task of cleaning out your attic to your family.

This post was prompted by two events:

  • The first was a showing I recently had where the buyers wanted to close in six weeks. The seller, however, had so much stuff everywhere (and the attic was jam-packed) that it would have taken her a month of Sundays to clear it all out. Her stuff included tons of memorabilia, restaurant menus, knickknacks, books, clothes, and some stunning antiques and artwork. There was a lot that would simply have to be thrown out, and some of it shouldn’t be thrown out. But in the heat of the moment, when someone is under pressure to clear out the house, mistakes will be made. Valuable things may be thrown out and worthless things will remain.
  • The second event was my own trip into my attic. I call my attic Limbo because that’s where I throw everything that I don’t know what to do with. It’s also a one-way street. It goes up, but it never comes down. So after 35 years of living in the same house, I know there is a vast amount of crap memories up there.

Cleaning the attic is an onerous chore; no one really wants to get caught in the trip down memory lane that will take years to complete. Trust me, I know. I had boxes of cards, gifts, memorabilia, and stuffed animals for each of my children. It took me an entire afternoon because, of course, I had to read every card! And that was just one box.

So here are some of the suggestions that worked for me; maybe they will work for you.

  • Get some help. Enlist the aid of your children, spouse, or a professional service. They will keep you on track.
  • Tackle it one box at a time. Bring the box down from the attic and decide on the contents’ final destination: garbage, recycling, donating, giving to a family member, selling it, or having it appraised.
  • Set up a minimum goal of how many boxes you will deal with each week and hold yourself to it.

Toss It

I am all for recycling and reusing wherever possible, but there is probably a good amount of junk that simply must be tossed, such as old Halloween costumes, decomposing papers sprinkled with glitter, melted plastic items, etc.

Give It Back

If you have been saving someone else’s memories, put the stuff in a pile and give it to the person. Chances are they will have a much easier time of throwing it out than you would. When I presented each of my children with boxes of their kindergarten homework, they thought I was nuts. They looked through it for old time’s sake and just as quickly tossed it.

Give It Away

You may have useful items in the attic that someone else would love to have. I had 16 place settings of Christmas dishes that I hadn’t used in twenty years and knew I would never use them again, so I gave eight place settings to each of my daughters. My son decided he would rather have an old turntable that was up there.  If there are things that your family or friends can use, offer it to them. Wouldn’t you rather see them enjoy it than have it rot in the attic? There are also plenty of charitable organizations that would be glad to accept donations. A rule of thumb: If you haven’t seen it, used it, or thought about it in five years, you probably don’t need it now.

Appraise It

For the valuable things in your attic, like silver candlesticks, old collectibles, or antiques, consider having them appraised to see if they really are worth anything. You may just have cash in the attic that will help pay for your next vacation!

Sell It

If you have valuable items that you want to sell, consider selling it to an appraiser, on eBay or Craigslist, or at a tag sale.  If you have things that are not really valuable but that someone might want to buy anyway, a tag sale may be the quickest way to get rid of a lot of stuff.

Save It

You don’t have to get rid of everything! There may be some items that you want to hang on to, and that’s fine.  Just make sure to keep them in the open so you can truly enjoy them and not just have them collecting dust in a storage area.

Cleaning out the attic will be the hardest task, but it is the most important task.  By paring down your stuff, separating trash from treasure, and keeping only what is essential, you will be ready when you want to make a decision about where and how you want to spend your retirement years.

 

Peggy Chirico, REALTOR®
Serving the Greater Hartford Area
Prudential Connecticut Realty


If you are buying or selling a home in Hartford County or Tolland County, please call me at 860-748-8900, , or use the Contact Request Form.  I would be happy to help you with your home search or answer any of your real estate questions.

Find your dream home now!

Posted in Baby Boomer Series, For Sellers | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Vernon CT Market Report for November 2011



 


Homes sold in Vernon CTReal estate sales in Vernon CT during November were typical of most of the year, holding steady at 14 homes sold.  However, this is just 2/3 of what was sold in November 2010 (22).

The median price also took a big hit this November over last November ($146,250 was the median price for November 2011 compared to a median price of $226,000 for November 2010).

Here is the breakdown by price range:

Price Range November 2011 November 2010
Under $100,000 4 4
$100,000-$149,999 4 3
$149,999-$199,999 3 2
$200,000-$249,999 3 7
$250,000-$299,999 - 4
$300,000-$349,999 - 1
$350,000-$399,999 - 1
Over $400,000 - -
Total 14 22

It’s interesting that all the sales this November were under $250,000, whereas last November there were six in the upper price ranges.

When we look at how November compared to the rest of 2011, we can see that the number of houses sold are within a fairly tight range, but the median prices are all over the place. One of the problems with looking at median prices is that it is a reflection of who is buying houses in any given month, and during November, buyers were buying lower-priced homes.

There are also 22 homes under contract (with a median list price of $169,555) and 15 homes under deposit (with a median list price of $149,900), so we should expect similar numbers over the next couple of months.

Here is a recap of the year so far in Vernon CT:

Month # of Closed Sales Median Price
November 14 $146,250
October 16 $171,750
September 12 $161,500
August 14 $205,250
July 12 $210,000
June 18 $138,750
May 14 $177,000
April 5 $155,000
March 7 $206,000
February 13 $140,000
January 11 $195,500

I think it is interesting to see which houses actually sold during November 2011 in Vernon CT, along with list price, sold price, and days on market (DOM):

Address

List Price

Sold Price

DOM

27 Rhode Island Avenue

$12,000

$8,000

160

44 Middle Terrace

$54,900

$54,000

12

22 Bancroft Road

$83,900

$75,000

27

42 Campbell Avenue

$99,999

$93,000

81

6 Fox Hill Drive

$144,900

$110,000

78

291 Phoenix Street

$140,000

$140,000

11

20 King Street

$155,900

$143,000

50

20 Bellevue Avenue

$149,900

$149,500

107

12 Scott Drive

$149,900

$151,000

11

10 Eva Circle

$179,900

$175,000

28

46 Pinewood Drive

$199,900

$199,900

45

74 Gerald Drive

$199,900

$201,000

8

111 Scott Drive

$219,900

$213,000

151

50 Duncaster Road

$249,000

$245,000

174

 

If you are looking at a home in Vernon CT, there are currently 116 homes on the market with a median list price of $205,900.  That means that there are 10.9 months of inventory (the absorption rate) in Vernon CT.  Generally speaking, sellers are facing a longer time on the market unless their homes are priced right for the condition, and buyers have a greater selection, depending on the price range they are looking in.  If you are thinking about buying or selling in Vernon CT, be sure to contact me.  I would be happy to help you!

 

Peggy Chirico, REALTOR®
Serving the Greater Hartford Area
Prudential Connecticut Realty


If you are buying or selling a home in Hartford County or Tolland County, please call me at 860-748-8900, , or use the Contact Request Form.  I would be happy to help you with your home search or answer any of your real estate questions.

Find your dream home now!

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